I love climbing! I think it’s great. I enjoy it pretty much any way it comes, whether it’s sport climbing, bouldering, trad climbing, onsighting, redpointing, working a hard project, chilling out and just messing about on rock, I love it all. I am never happier than when I am climbing.

I am also a big fan of training. I think this is great too! Training helps you rapidly improve your ability and achieve your climbing dreams. It’s also really good fun! There is nothing quite like giving yourself a good beasting down at the wall, or the satisfaction of making it to the end of a particularly brutal session. In my view, it is hard to find anything bad to say about training.

I think it is fair to say that I am usually pretty psyched. In fact, I’d go so far as to say I am often psyched out of my mind. I regularly get so psyched that I can barely sit still, let alone concentrate on work or whatever it is I am supposed to be doing. Everything is just a countdown to the next training session or visit to a crag. However, despite this, there are distinct periods over the year when my motivation wanes. Sometimes it almost completely disappears.

If I tick a hard project or achieve a goal that I have been working towards for a long time, then immediately afterwards I suffer a massive dip in psyche. It’s as if all the pressure of trying to achieve something has suddenly lifted and I can no longer be bothered to try. My climbing standard drops dramatically for a few weeks as I can hardly be bothered to put my shoes on, let alone actually try and achieve something worthwhile. The first time this happened to me, I felt quite alarmed. It just wasn’t like me to feel this way and I didn’t understand it. Suffering such a terrible drop in standard, which seems to accompany it, is also hard to take. It is as if all strength, fitness, coordination and ability to climb leaves you overnight. However, over the years I have come to realise that sometimes your brain needs a rest as much as your body and this is just my mind saying it needs a break. When I feel like this, I have learnt to go with the flow, go easy on myself and just wait for the psyche (and with it my form) to return. Within a couple of weeks it always does.

I often suffer temporary dips in psyche just before I achieve something big. If a goal I am working towards, for example ticking a particular route or onsighting a certain grade, is taking longer than I think it should then I often reach a point of desperation right before I manage to succeed when I announce that I’ve had enough, it’s all too depressing and I can’t be bothered any more. My husband says it is at this point that he is certain I am going to succeed!

Towards the end of the training year (round about now, in fact) I often suffer a drop in motivation too. Fun and rewarding though training is, it is also incredibly mentally tough to push yourself to the limit 5-6 days a week, every week for a whole year. My head, and my body, is starting to say “enough!”. I am also really bad in the cold and find it difficult to keep motivated when it is freezing down at the wall or at the crag and it is hard to keep warm. My Rab Vapour-Rise trousers are a god-send for this time of year. They are the warmest bit of kit I have ever worn and I couldn’t be without them over winter. It can be difficult around Christmas too because people tend to kick back and relax during the festive season, but my coach has me training hard right through ‘til the end of December.

In January, I get some well-earned rest and take a month off climbing completely. I love this time as it gives me the chance to recover from the year’s training and to regain my psyche. When February comes, I know that motivation levels will be higher than ever and I will be bursting with enthusiasm once more. This is one of the reasons I love the spring so much. In fact, just thinking about it whilst writing this is making me psyched! There is one thing that I have learnt about myself over the years, and that is that, no matter how hard I try, I never stay de-motivated for long.[:us]The latest blog post from our sponsored pro Jules Littlefair.

I love climbing! I think it’s great. I enjoy it pretty much any way it comes, whether it’s sport climbing, bouldering, trad climbing, onsighting, redpointing, working a hard project, chilling out and just messing about on rock, I love it all. I am never happier than when I am climbing.

I am also a big fan of training. I think this is great too! Training helps you rapidly improve your ability and achieve your climbing dreams. It’s also really good fun! There is nothing quite like giving yourself a good beasting down at the wall, or the satisfaction of making it to the end of a particularly brutal session. In my view, it is hard to find anything bad to say about training.

I think it is fair to say that I am usually pretty psyched. In fact, I’d go so far as to say I am often psyched out of my mind. I regularly get so psyched that I can barely sit still, let alone concentrate on work or whatever it is I am supposed to be doing. Everything is just a countdown to the next training session or visit to a crag. However, despite this, there are distinct periods over the year when my motivation wanes. Sometimes it almost completely disappears.

If I tick a hard project or achieve a goal that I have been working towards for a long time, then immediately afterwards I suffer a massive dip in psyche. It’s as if all the pressure of trying to achieve something has suddenly lifted and I can no longer be bothered to try. My climbing standard drops dramatically for a few weeks as I can hardly be bothered to put my shoes on, let alone actually try and achieve something worthwhile. The first time this happened to me, I felt quite alarmed. It just wasn’t like me to feel this way and I didn’t understand it. Suffering such a terrible drop in standard, which seems to accompany it, is also hard to take. It is as if all strength, fitness, coordination and ability to climb leaves you overnight. However, over the years I have come to realise that sometimes your brain needs a rest as much as your body and this is just my mind saying it needs a break. When I feel like this, I have learnt to go with the flow, go easy on myself and just wait for the psyche (and with it my form) to return. Within a couple of weeks it always does.

I often suffer temporary dips in psyche just before I achieve something big. If a goal I am working towards, for example ticking a particular route or onsighting a certain grade, is taking longer than I think it should then I often reach a point of desperation right before I manage to succeed when I announce that I’ve had enough, it’s all too depressing and I can’t be bothered any more. My husband says it is at this point that he is certain I am going to succeed!

Towards the end of the training year (round about now, in fact) I often suffer a drop in motivation too. Fun and rewarding though training is, it is also incredibly mentally tough to push yourself to the limit 5-6 days a week, every week for a whole year. My head, and my body, is starting to say “enough!”. I am also really bad in the cold and find it difficult to keep motivated when it is freezing down at the wall or at the crag and it is hard to keep warm. My Rab Vapour-Rise trousers are a god-send for this time of year. They are the warmest bit of kit I have ever worn and I couldn’t be without them over winter. It can be difficult around Christmas too because people tend to kick back and relax during the festive season, but my coach has me training hard right through ‘til the end of December.

In January, I get some well-earned rest and take a month off climbing completely. I love this time as it gives me the chance to recover from the year’s training and to regain my psyche. When February comes, I know that motivation levels will be higher than ever and I will be bursting with enthusiasm once more. This is one of the reasons I love the spring so much. In fact, just thinking about it whilst writing this is making me psyched! There is one thing that I have learnt about myself over the years, and that is that, no matter how hard I try, I never stay de-motivated for long.